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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys first time post, but I've been bowfishing for about 6 years now. I run a 1648 G3. The majority of lakes near me are electric only so I've been running 3 class 29 batteries in parallel connected to an inverter. I run an extension cord to 3 Viugreum 150's. Lately I've been getting a Max of three hours out of the lights. Shouldn't I be getting more time? Am I doing something wrong. The three batteries in parallel are 5 years old but have always been charged with a marine charger. When they died last my multimeter read 12.2 on them. Any advice would be appreciated!
 

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need some more info … can you find or know the amp draw on the 150's? second what's the amperage of the inverter, what kind of of generator? how long are you charging off the water? have you tested the batteries individually ?
 

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Thanks for the reply amsugg. I'll get you that amperage info in about two hours when j get home from work. As far as how long they are charged, they are always plugged into the charger/conditioner unless the boat is on the water. I normally get it out once a week.
 

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Is your charger /conditioner the same thing you use on the water?
 

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Sounds like he is running the lights off the batteries through the inverter and not running a generator.
 

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Yep I knew something wasn't adding up
 

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So, depending on brand, your batteries probably store about 90-100 amp-hours each when new. That number does fall off as they age and are used more (the more you draw them down each time, the shorter their life). Your lights draw about 150 watts each so 450 total. You will loose some power thru your inverter. It's probably 90% or more efficient (this info should be available from the manufacturer). Just to be conservative lets assume 80%. That means the total load on your batteries (assuming nothing else like running lights, troller, etc.) is about 562.5 watts. At 12 volts that's 46.88 amps. The problem is that most inverters have an auto shut-off that is set much higher then what the batteries are tested to. So you're getting about half the use from your batteries which will make them last much longer, but not go as long each night. The best way to do this would be to get rid of the inverter and get 12 volt LEDs like from Custom Fitz or 5 Star LED. This way you don't have the power loss thru the inverter and the lights will stay on and let you drain the batteries completely. Assuming your batteries have a 90 amp-hour capacity and still having 450 watts of light, you should be able to go about 7 hours with this set-up.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yes like I said in the first post most of our lakes are electric only unfortunately so I rarely get to use my generator. I could not find amperage numbers for the lights or the inverter, I know the Viugreum 100s pull .84 or so of amperage. The inverter is an Erayak 800w continuous/1600 w max off of Amazon. So other than switching to DC only (which I'll look into) or getting new batteries, are there any other ways of getting more time? Would a heavier guage extension cord or multiple ext cords make any difference? And seriously thank you guys so much for all the input and help!
 

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A heavier extension cord between the inverter and lights won't do much good, but shorter, heavier wire between the batteries and inverter could. What's probably stopping you is the low voltage shut-off in the inverter. The smaller and longer the cord is the more voltage drop you will get. Assuming the 562 watts we calculated earlier, to have a 1% voltage drop, you would need to keep the total cable (sum of positive and negative cable lengths) less then 10' if you use AWG 4 cable. If that length needs to increase to 20', you would need to move up to AWG 1 cable. You should also be using this heavy cable to parallel the batteries. This still won't get you as long a run time as DC lights, but it will help.
 
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