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I'm working on a project boat and when I flipped it over tonight to sand the bottom while prepping for paint I found a few pin holes in the bottom. The thing that's concerning me is that the holes seem to have originated from the interior of the boat. The paint on the bottom had no wear on it at all in those spots so they had to have come from an older "spill type" incident. I don't have a whole lot of access to a spool gun to patch so I am asking if JB Weld will do they trick. I cannot access the holes from the interior because they are under a foam filled bench. Can I apply JB weld and paint over it? I have no idea how the stuff works.
 

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NO!!!! Cause when it needs fixed correctly the welder will cuss you up and down and charge you triple!!! As of right now it's an easy fix for a good TIG welder it'll take him about 10 mins from start to finish.
 

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x2. I'd put a 2" circle around them with a sharpie and find a competent welder in your area. He'll be able to fix it up in no time and it'll be a permanent fix
 

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I don't think it's as simple as just welding it up, doesn't look like a puncture. Looks like the aluminum has just been worn away in those areas meaning the aluminum is paper thin right there. If you can find a tig welder I would cut a small area out around it and check the thickness and weld a new piece back in. Not sure where these are located on the boat. If you can get to them from the inside of the boat you could find a small piece and lay over it and weld it up.
 

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I don't think it's as simple as just welding it up, doesn't look like a puncture. Looks like the aluminum has just been worn away in those areas meaning the aluminum is paper thin right there. If you can find a tig welder I would cut a small area out around it and check the thickness and weld a new piece back in. Not sure where these are located on the boat. If you can get to them from the inside of the boat you could find a small piece and lay over it and weld it up.
X2:D
 

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Looks to me like electrolysis done ate that hull up from the inside out. I've seen it before like that and it was from the boat sitting up for long periods with a lil water in it and the 12V system grounded to the hull. I'd deff pull that floor and foam out and do a thorough inspection before spending another nickel on it.
 

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I don't think it's as simple as just welding it up, doesn't look like a puncture. Looks like the aluminum has just been worn away in those areas meaning the aluminum is paper thin right there. If you can find a tig welder I would cut a small area out around it and check the thickness and weld a new piece back in. Not sure where these are located on the boat. If you can get to them from the inside of the boat you could find a small piece and lay over it and weld it up.
This was my original thought as well.

You can take a 1/8" bit and drill a few holes in the area around those pit holes-my money says it's gonna be paper thin. It won't be an issue to weld up your drilled holes since you'll need those others welded up anyways.
 

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I had a similar experience with an old Alumacraft fishing boat. I was my fault. I left the drain plug in and the rain filled her up. Submerged all of my batteries and the acid leeched out. I had holes all over within a few weeks. Pretty much anywhere there was floatation foam. I assume the foam absorbed some of the highly acid water and held it in contact with the aluminum.

Like an idiot, about ten years later I pulled the same bonehead mistake with my jon boat. Luckily I have no foam in the boat. This time I drained the boat, filled it up with fresh water a couple times to rinse it out in all the inaccessible places. Then I filled it up with water again, added baking soda and circulated it to finish neutralizing the acid. I kept doing this until the rinse water reached a neutral Ph with a handheld meter.

Going on five years now and I have zero signs of corrosion.

BTW, on the Alumacraft, I just drilled out each pinhole with a 3/16" bit and then plugged the holes with marine silicone. That was a fishing boat though, never slid it across logs, rocks or sandbars. It stayed watertight for five years before I sold it.
 

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NO!!!! Cause when it needs fixed correctly the welder will cuss you up and down and charge you triple!!! As of right now it's an easy fix for a good TIG welder it'll take him about 10 mins from start to finish.
Agree 100%

I used TB Weld during a tournament one year to fix a big crack in my boat and the welder cussed me like a dog. Said to never use that crap if you plan on getting it welded in the near future. So i would say no way. Get it fixed the correct way by welding it.
 
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